Monthly Archives: July 2020

Get the whole group together.

In person, one-on-one meetings are important for personal follow up discussion about the topics in the feedback loop. Larger group meetings are important because they allow everyone to hear the same thing at the same time. Everyone also gets to look around the room and be reminded of who is on the team. In a day where

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One-on-Ones

Leaders should never underestimate the value of a face-to-face interaction. I would normally say that physical presence is essential, but after Covid-19 I have learned that while physical presence is ideal, it’s not essential. Teams need an opportunity to talk about the topics addressed in the weekly feedback loop. While emails and other communication can deliver information,

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The loop is necessary.

A feedback loop is just that – a loop. This means that feedback should not go unresponded to. This does not mean that every idea is a good idea. It means that when feedback is given, it should be treated as a conversation. In fact, feedback should be the machine that drives most of the conversations a

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Intention Beats Inconvenience

Every team that is built to grow requires a feedback loop. This form of important communication requires intentional systems to ensure it happens, even when inconvenient. Convenience is usually the number one priority of those who are fatigued so it is important to create an expectation where, despite the inconvenience, the feedback is expected because anyone can

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Caring Curiosity

Collaboration requires communication. Assumptions are the enemy to teamwork because they waste time and effort undoing work or figuring out where the same work was done separately. Communication requires curiosity about what others are contributing and how I can contribute. Those who are in the habit of not communicating are not curious and do not want you

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Learn Who to Trust in Collaboration

Collaboration cannot start without a measure of unearned trust. True collaboration takes a risk to trust those you may not know well enough to work well with. This makes the initial days of a new collaborative effort awkward and tense. These awkward beginnings require an intentional attitude of initial trust to get the work going because withholding

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Is stingy trust wise?

Many people say they like teamwork but they don’t really like to trust people. Too often trust is withheld until there is a reason to trust and that game of purity tests just results in lost time for the team to actually get to work together. People who withhold trust until “___________ happens” may just be holding

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Crucial Collaboration Content

Teams should grow together in their efforts or they limit their potential and collaboration. Collaboration requires that we work with someone else though it’s not always natural for people to share their ideas with others. When we know each other, it becomes easier to share because we develop trust but when we don’t know something, we tend

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“Who They Are” or “What They Do”

Teammates should not be treated as if what they do is more important than who they are. However, when a team values the outcome of a person’s work more than they value the person, the message is sent loud and clear. Teams must demonstrate not only appreciation for a job well done but also for the opportunity

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What does money communicate?

One of the lessons that I learned from firsthand experience is that compensation is one of the most powerful ways to communicate value. People who we value should be compensated in a way that accurately communicates how much we value them. When you pay someone the market rate for their services, that can seem fair. If that

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