Monthly Archives: November 2015

Favorites: Self-imposed Rules

Dan Pierce/ November 20, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

When teams are managing change, it is important to keep as open a mind as possible. I have learned that the best way to keep an open mind is to limit my favorites. We all have our favorite color and foods but we should not have a favorite way or method. When we do, we tend to

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Building a Repertoire

Dan Pierce/ November 19, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

Consistent flexibility is a unique trait of great teams. The ability to adjust when necessary is an advantage over teams that are limited to a narrow scope of skills and methods. Consistent flexibility allows a team to constantly come up with new ways to solve problems and attack opponents. This builds the repertoire of a team over

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Flexibility

Dan Pierce/ November 18, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

Great teams never allow what they do to determine who they are. Greatness requires us to like being great without liking what we did to be great. Times and circumstance change and the demands of effectiveness may shift with the season. Great teams are able to adjust because they don’t identify themselves with their methods. The methods

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Consistency

Dan Pierce/ November 17, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

Great teams are consistent. They are not afraid of the grind. They are not afraid of the mundane tasks that get the job done. They are disciplined enough to stick with something after the fuzzy feelings of newness and novelty wear away. Ordinary teams get bored quickly and they are not disciplined enough in the less than

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Rare Qualities

Dan Pierce/ November 16, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

I admire great teams. Like them or not, the New England Patriots are a great team. They have won more Superbowls in the last two decades than any other team. What makes them stand out? Consistency, flexibility, and a passionate team-first mindset are the qualities that draw my attention to great teams. It’s a simple formula but

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The Anti-Vision

Dan Pierce/ November 15, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

A few fearful team members should never veto a new direction. Deciding things based on the fear of a few is a great path to mediocrity. If the team does its best to communicate the need for change on the path forward, then it is free to take the steps on that path regardless if others are

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Making Change Stick

Dan Pierce/ November 14, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

It is important to intentionally evaluate a change in direction long after it is implemented. What happened when all the unknowns became known? What did we learn? What is the next step based on the experience we gained? How was everyone actually affected? Did the team accomplish what was promised when the vision was cast? If not,

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Careful Compromises

Dan Pierce/ November 13, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 1 comments

Compromise is something that should always be handled with care. Compromising too soon or too often communicates an insecurity in the proposed direction. A lack of willingness to compromise can communicate a closed mind that is unwilling to listen or consider the opinions of others. Great compromises result from careful consideration of multiple perspectives that move the

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Stick With It

Dan Pierce/ November 12, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

Even when change has been accepted, there are always a few who hold out hoping that the change will just fade away behind the old way. They wait to see if the team really meant it when they chose the new direction. A team really demonstrates a commitment to the new direction when they do not second

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Step 2

Dan Pierce/ November 11, 2015/ Teambuilding/ 0 comments

Once a new direction has been accepted and the team begins to move forward, it is important to ramp up attention surrounding the implementation of the change. Too often the approval of a new direction is thought of as a victory and the team begins to celebrate the approval and feel entitled to the effects of change

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